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English 95
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 101 (some duplicates have been removed)
in northern pakistan. tension over the indian flag continues in northern ireland as streets prepare for more protests. and as orthodox christians celebrate christmas, we speak to the egyptian pope. the international community has been quick to condemn syrian president bashar al assad's plan for peace in war-torn countries. the first speech called "beyond hypocritical." addressing supporters, described the opposition as terrorists and slaves of foreign power. he went on to support the national dialogue to end the 21-no conflict. assad these talks could create a national charter on syria's future, which he put to a referendum. while the opposition dismissed the proposals saying they're aimed at wrecking current diplomatic efforts. we frort amman's neighboring jordan. in an opera house in central damascus, packed with cheering supporters, the syrian president gave his first speech since june last year. he did not reveal any breakthrough to end the conflict but said every syrian had an ethical duty to fight rebels he linked with al qaeda. >> they are terrorists who follow al qaeda's philosophy.
are entering their fourth day. training camps and logistic depots were bombed. in pakistan the government is removing staff for failing to provide security after 96 people were killed in twin bombings on thursday. most of the victims shia muslims. in pakistan a cleric has begun what he calls a strong -- long march from the city of lahore to the capital of is not bad. he once sweeping electoral reforms, but critics say he does want to upset elections later this year. >> he is only 12 years old, but that is old enough to be immersed in politics in pakistan. >> the government is wrong. they have made our life helle. >> some have thrown their support behind a canadian- pakistani crcleric. his message resonates with people fed up with the breakdown of law and order and an increase of corruption and inflation. many are so angry that even mothers with no relation to the clerics s say they are ready to sacrifice their children. >> i told my children not to be afraid of bullets. take the bullet in your chest. we want change and revolution. our society will not move forward until we become selfless
. affiliated movements have taken us beyond the core leadership in afghanistan and pakistan, including the middle east, and east africa, central asia, and southeast asia. although each group is unique, all aspire to advance al qaeda's agenda by stabilizing the companies in which they operate and attacking the u.s. and plotting to strike it u.s. homeland. in south asia, al qaeda continues to pose a threat from its base of operation in pakistan's tribal areas. in order to use that to carry a attacks against a homeland as well as our interests and those of our allies and partners in pakistan, afghanistan, india, and europe. the united states faces to counter terrorism charges -- a direct threat posed by al qaeda in the arabian peninsula and the individuals and charities that flow from the region to al qaeda and its affiliates from world. on this point particularly, i want to emphasize severing the pipeline is a major part of what we're doing in its administration. al qaeda has shifted its activities to the relative safe haven of northern mali where it is training fighters and other allied
. >> pakistan in turmoil as the supreme court orders the prime minister's rest -- are rest. >> france's mali mission. >> and has disgraced cyclist lance armstrong finally owned up to cheating? we begin in pakistan where the supreme court has ordered the arrest of the prime minister and 16 others over corruption charges. >> this came after a mass protest in the capital added to pressure by the government. >> and aid to the government has accused the military of orchestrating the protests, and the order to arrest the prime minister. this political turmoil comes just months ahead of national elections. >> instead of millions, security officials say it is more like 25,000 protesters gathered in the parliaments in islamabad. there have been isolated clashes, and there was violence as demonstrators reached the heavily fortified area around the parliament building. gunshots were heard, but it was unclear if they were from protesters or police. he is so far unknown in pakistani politics and is demanding the government step down immediately and that a caretaker government be set up to ensure that ele
conducted by our c.i.a. principally in pakistan, afghanistan and somalia that will be our focus in a few moments. filmmaker and activist robert greenwald is back from pakistan where he tried determine if strikes which washington says are targeted on terrorists are making the u.s. any safer or rather creating a new generation of anti--american militants. now according to pakistani foreign minister, hina rabbani khar, things are making it worse. >> you're creating a thousand more people who will go in the ranks of al-qaeda and the taliban because they feel that when civilians die and illegal activity happens in another territory, it is a hostile one and it is something which has reaction. >> john: we'll have more on drone warfare in a moment. first for the latest on the algerian hostage crisis, we're joined by carlo munoz staff writer, following the story. thank you for following the story tonight. >> thank you for having me. >> john: what is the latest? they say the assault is over but apparently some prisoners are still, in fact, being held. >> that's what -- sort of where the situation
is back from pakistan to determine if strikes are strickly targeted targeted on terrorists are making americans safer or creating a new generation ofant i-american militants. >> you are creating 1,000 morminds in people who will go in the ranks of the al qaeda and taliban and feel illegal activity happens it is a hostile one and something that has reaction. >> we will have more on the dron warfare in a moment. first on the crisis we are joined by the staff writer for defense and national defense for the hill. >> thank you for having me. >> what is the latest? officials say the assault is over but some prisoners are still being held. >> that's where the situation stands right now. you mentioned alger an special forces and the numbers regarding the hostages still on the -- at the facility, it is just as murky as the numbers coming out as who were killed and who escaped. some reports have said as many as two americans are still on the facility under lock and key by the militants who are there. again, reports vary. >> are
's influential board and has served as a senior advisor as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasr. [cheers and applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on the big foreign policy challenge of the day you have to think about our next debater. his program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide but he's anything but a talking head on tv. he writes a column for "the washington post" and is the edit or "time" magazine. please welcome back to the munk debate stage journalist fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] now we're moments from getting our debate under way but before we hear opening statements, once again, i need this audience assist answer to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remark and we move forward as a debate together. so you will see this countdown clock, this clock appear. when it reaches zero applaud. this will let our debaters know that their time is over for their opening and closing statements. before we kick off the debate let's see how the 3,000 people gathered today voted
of the world. >> yeah. there is one such conflict. a drive by shooting in pakistan left several aide workers dead. >> the attack took place outside the capitol. it is unclear who was responsible it. follows the killing of nine workers in pakistan last month. >> well, some people in russia may be waking up to a new year's hangover today. but those that like their vodka might have to dig a little deeper to afford it. >> that is because moscow imposed a hefty tax on the spirit in a bid to curb the country's high alcoholism rate. >> russia's favorite beverage got a lot more expensive. they will have to swallow a new alcohol tax. russians are trying to laugh it off. >> i used to get to know a man and he would buy me a fine bottle of bubbly, now it barely buys a cheap sparkling wine. it is a real shame. >> the kremlin wants russians to drink less. alcohol ads banned since last summer and the new tax hike is an attempt to quench the country's thirst for hard liquor. many believe it is not dangerous if they only drink a little. but it is. you don't have to be an alcoholic to die from drinking too mu
army is accusing pakistan of breaking the terms of the cease-fire in the disputed region of kashmir. the pakistani army claims one of its soldiers was killed in a cross border raids by the indian army. india said pakistan fired across the border for this. >> it is evident the pakistani army continues to violate the cease-fire agreement. maybe to facilitate infiltration attempts. the attempts of the infiltrators will not succeed. >> security issues aside, pakistan has to worry about widespread poverty. the un says more than half the population barely has enough to eat, and the energy shortage is making things worse. >> he used to be able to provide for his family. not anymore. a shortage of natural gas has taken his jobs. >>, as opposed to feed my kids? if it goes on like this, i would have no choice. >> the machinery in factories now stand idle. production lines are empty for thousands of workers out of the job. the energy crisis has paralyzed production in more than 500 factories. the government says it has to meet the demand from household users, but the result is an increase in u
as a senior advisor recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrook, former munk bedator. now, when you think of provocktiff conversation on the big foreign policy challenges of the day you have to think about our next debator. his flagship global affairs program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide. but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he writes a highly respected column for the "washington post" and is the editor at large of time magazine. his numerous best-selling books include the post american world and the future of freedom. now, we are just moments from getting our debate under way but before we hear opening statements once again i am going to need this audience's assistance as the night goes on to make sure our debators stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remarks and that we move forward as a debate together. so you will see this countdown clock appear when it reaches 0 applaud this will let our debators know that their time is over for their opening and closing statements. and finally before we kick off the debate le
personally intervened to resolve a diplomatic crises and difficult places from pakistan and afghanistan to egypt and sudan. and i really look forward to working with you on some of the challenging issues as it faces the country in the world but we start back to something and number of senators have referred to in your opening statement which you said. i just want to say i've been deeply encouraged by your response to senator shaheen's comments and senator rubio. we are sadly foreign commercial service woefully underrepresented and wherever opportunity to advocate for american business and american values and as you know i chaired to the hearings on this. we are about to come out with a report from the subcommittee and i would be interested as the first of my several questions and how you see has successfully competing with china which has a rapidly growing footprint across africa in both economic opportunities and in our differing values agenda and what that makes doing for and how you would address that as secretary e and senator coons were a terrific team with respect to africa and i
organizations in pakistan's tribal areas who have argued from their perspective on the ground, civilian casualties are rather minimal. but other than some sporadic conversations i've had with people in the tribal areas, i think the data we have publicly is limited. >> brown: what does your data show, or people you talk to show? >> two things. one is tomorrow the united nations is going to announce it's appointing a special investigator into civilian deaths by drones, and through this targeted killing program. so we should be able to get some of the real facts through this u.n. investigation. it's ridiculous that the united states itself hasn't conducted this kind of investigation. of or disclose its results. but that investigation will be done by the u.n. the second thing is general mcchrystal just earlier this month talks of talked about the drone program and how-- how th the-- the attacks on civilians and the civilian casualties are cause, what he calls a vis viseral reaction of hatred in the affected countries, the very people we're trying to win over to our side. >> brown: that's be
, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has a colin -- it is what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administration. i know that john kerry cares deeply about our country and our national security. i know he believes in
news just coming in now. we are getting reports that a roadside bomb in pakistan has killed 17 soldiers and wounded 22 others. we will have more on that as we get it. pilgrims are that area in northern india for an event held every 12 years. it is the largest gathering of hindus in the world. our reporter is in the city where millions are affected by the two month festival. >> these are just some of the early arrivals. early arrivals.
reportedly has decided to exclude cia drone strikes in pakistan from new legal oversight for targeted killings overseas. the washington post reports counter-terrorism adviser and cia-nominee john brennan has signed off on a plan to exempt the drone attacks in pakistan from a list of operations that would be covered under newly enacted rules. areas covered in the so-called play book include the process for adding names to kill lists, the principles for killing u.s. citizens abroad, and the command chain for authorizing cia or u.s. military strikes outside war zones. the exemption of drone strikes in pakistan would allow the cia to continue carrying them without -- tearing them without a legal framework for a to two years. the hostage standoff in a jury of his ended in the deaths of dozens of people, including up to 48 of the captured workers. algerian forces say they recovered at least 25 bodies after storming the militant held gas complex saturday, bringing the confirmed death toll to least 80. witnesses say the hostages were brutally executed. the toll could have been worse as hundre
and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sedan. -- sudan. historians will be judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy at much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i want to ask john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to eject. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has -- it is what we do. we fight for people back,. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administration. i know that john kerry cares deeply about our c
essential for taking on taliban and al qaeda forces in an accessible regions in afghanistan, pakistan, and yemen. but given the number of innocent civilians killed by unmanned u.s. drones, the german government is under pressure to justify why it needed these weapons to carry out targeted killings. >> that's a good question. more on this with our correspondent at our parliamentary studios. why is germany considering this? >> the government itself and the military in germany say that these weapons are very precise, and they enable the armed forces to attack rapidly and precisely. there is, of course, more to it than that. they are also a lot cheaper than, for example, fighter jets. the army is going through restructuring at the moment. it has budget cuts, and it is also in need of reauthorization. britain, of course, has armed jones. it will use them in afghanistan. italy, which has already reconnaissance drones, is going to upgrade them. there's also some talk of a european combined program. >> this was touched on in the report. our civilian deaths the reason this is so controversial?
. they now risk being arrested. mobile phone services in pakistan have been suspended a hell of celebrations -- have been suspended ahead of celebrations for the prophet muhammad. the government suspended services and stepped up security to prevent any military attack. events promoting gay rights could be banned throughout russia as the country's parliament adopt a controversial rule to end what it calls homosexual propaganda. in the next few minutes we should know whether andy murr ay or roger federer wins the australian open. now we have all of the business news. jamie, we have to start with an astounding performance from samsung, suggesting they are kings of the phone market. >> 700,000 smartphones. i could not believe there were quite so many every single day. it outshines apple. they overtook apple last year, so they are the number 1 smartphone mfg.. >> is this really about price? are samsung doing well because they are more competitive? >> no, they have a wider range. they can compete alone, where apple does not go. they have also got a very good product line coming out. the mobile pho
policy board and has served as a senior adviser as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrooke, former munk debater. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasser. [applause] when you think of provocative conversation on a big foreign policy challenges of the day, you have to think about our next debater. his flagship global affairs overam on cnn is seen in 200 countries worldwide but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he rights a highly respected column for "the washington post" and is the editor-at-large of "time" magazine. his numerous best selling books include "the post-american world" and "the future of freedom." please welcome back to the munk debate stage, broadcaster and journalist, fareed zukaria. we are just moments from getting our debate underway but before we hear from opening statements, once again, i'm going to need this audience's assistance as the night goes on to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remarks and that we move forward as a debate together so you will see this countdown clock
three questions. one is afghanistan, the sec is pakistan. with regard to afghanistan, i wanted to ask you about the first question relates to president karzai and the leches ahead of them. when he was here just a couple of weeks ago, i had the chance to visit with him in leader mcconnel's office and a number of senators as well. and to ask him directly about the elections and ask him about my second question. but i wanted to get your sense of where you see those lexes going. what efforts you can undertake to make sure that they are free and fair because they've been, i think, central to the next chapter in this transition. i just wanted to comment on that. the second question as it relates to afghanistan is one that senator boxer raised and her work on this has been exemplary, on women and girls and in particular, i have a -- an amendment that we got through the national defense authorization act which would require both state and defense to file a report on the efforts to promote the security of afghan women and girls just by way of itemization monitoring and responding to changes in
, and pakistan. every other country in the world we are under the kind of contracting rules i think interfere with our capacity to get the best deal particularly when it comes to security we should in the countries where the threats unfortunately are going to always be with us. should we look to extend that to mali or somalia? >> there was an article i think in one of the newspapers today that went into detail. for more than two decades federal law required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractor to provide local guard services at the embassies abroad. there is that olding you get what you pay for and this lowest-price provision started off in 1990 but it has stayed with us and i would respectfully request this committee take a hard look at it. you cannot do a total lifting of it for everyone look at the high threat posts where obviously we did it for iraq, afghanistan, and pakistan and the countries you made would fall into that category. >> among the various islamic extremist groups operating in africa today, in your view which poses the greatest threat,
and giving. look at pakistan. we gave pakistan $2 billion a year and said to them, here, have this money, find bin laden. what did we do? we are getting -- they were never going to find bin laden. the minute they found him they lost the two million. so the tail shouldn't be wagging the dog when it comes to foreign assistance. >> thank you very much. after the bluster, the bs, the benghazi hearing moving into a debate over security funding. >> the funds provided by congress were enat quit. >> for the past two years ago the also meteorologist's meteorologist's for diplomatic fun has been slashed. >> congress has consistently given less. >> mullins and pickerring says that money was and is in the budget is very important and makes a difference. >> i would ask this committee to work with us. there are holds on the security funding going to libya. >> but the numbers tell a very different story. funding for embassy security in the region has actually been spiking and is expected to remain high. brett, that became the best sort of defense becoming offense. it's all the republicans' fault. >> it
-based bureau of investigative journalism, the u.s. has conducted 362 drone strikes in pakistan since 2004 with 128 in 2010 alone. the program's covert nature has alarmed civil rights activists and the human rights council has now launched an investigation into drone attacks connected to civilian casualties. joining us now to discuss the war on terror is the director of the aclu, national security project, hannah. thanks for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> this is a conversation that i think gradually is taking more of a role on center stage. especially with the appointment of john brennan and as we look at john kerry and chuck hagel. in terms of u.s. national security and foreign policy, the get month trials, however, we -- there was a lot of discussion, a lot of hub bub when they were going to be in new york, but here they are beginning in guantanamo bay, and there is very little discussion about the fact that they are happening there. you guys have challenged the sort of legitimacy of these. the nation writes today "at guantanamo the government is still making up the law as i
abroad, launching more than a dozen attacks in yemen and pakistan already this year. this week the u.s. launched at least five drone strikes in yemen in as many days, according to some reports, the latest attack mistakenly killed two children in yemen. north korea is selling to conduct further rocket launches and nuclear test and at the united states. the government issued the threat against what it calls its sworn enemy one day after the insecurity council resolution tightened sanctions in response to a north korean rocket launch last month. the u.n. resolution was approved with the backing of china, north korea's long major diplomatic ally. china is calling for a resumption of six-party talks in a bid to diffuse tensions. a former informant for the u.s. drug enforcement a ministration has been sentenced to 35 years in prison for his role in the 2008 attacks in mumbai. david headley has submitted to scouting targets for the group linked to the attacks. the group is blamed for killing 160 people, including six americans. he was given a reduced sentence in return for his testimony aga
served as a senior advisor as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrook, a former munk debater. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasser. [applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on a big foreign policy challenges of the day, you have to think about our next debater. his flagship global affairs program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide. but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he writes a highly respected column for the post and is the editor at large of "time" magazine. his numerous best selling books include "the post-american world" and "the future of freedom." please welcome back broadcaster and journalist, fareed zakaria. [applause] now we are just momenting from getting our debate under way but before we hear from opening statements, one again i'm going to need this audience's assistance as the night goes on to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remarks and that we move forward as a debate together. so you will see this countdown clock, this handy clock appear. when it rea
and pakistan. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasr. [cheers and applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on the big foreign policy challenge of the day you have to think about our next debater. his program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide but he's anything but a talking head on tv. he writes a column for "the washington post" and is the edit or "time" magazine. please welcome back to the munk debate stage journalist fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] now we're moments from getting our debate under way but before we hear opening statements, once again, i need this audience assist answer to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remark and we move forward as a debate together. so you will see this countdown clock, this clock appear. when it reaches zero applaud. this will let our debaters know that their time is over for their opening and closing statements. before we kick off the debate let's see how the 3,000 people gathered today voted on our resolution that the world cannot tolerate iran with nuclear weapons. let's see t
understand in when you went to islamabad, pakistan, in 2006, you said at that time a military strike against iran, a military option is not a viable, feasible or responsible option. now it seems what you're saying about the military option now seems inconsistent and why would you make that statement in pakistan that it's not a viable, feasible or responsible option in light of your statement today that you do, i have, and i stockly agree that a military option should be on the table. >> that statement was made in respect to all options with iran. and pakistan was where i was at the time. and the larger context of that was nuclear powers which certainly pakistan is part of that. and not unlike what secretary gates said on a strike on iran. my point was that this would not be a preferable option land the would be consequences to this option. things would happen as a result of it. if we could find a better option or way to deal with iran to assure they do not get nuclear weapons, then we are far better off. that was the context of that statement. >> i know my time is up and we will have an oppo
public and successful diplomatic interventions in afghanistan, pakistan and sudan. i think one day historians will judge his senate years in temperatures terms of his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many recognize senator ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, john has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or government but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said, it's the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he's been working quietly to help a father from newton, massachusetts, colin bauer, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he's been to egypt since then and every time colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator here has a colin bauer. it's what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific brid
, pakistan, iraq, afghanistan. >> right. >> certainly qualified to talk about matters of foreign relations, and he says chuck hagel is a statesman, and america has few of them. he knows the leaders of the world and their issues. at a time when bipartisanship is hard to find in washington, he personifies it. above all, he has an unbending focus on u.s. national security, from his service in vietnam decades ago to his current position on the intelligence advisory council. mr. hagel would run the defense department. it would not run him. what is -- you know as a senator, you say lots of things that make people angry. >> yeah. >> you've done that yourself, and it -- it has a long record. you can go back. >> absolutely. >> but for now and for here why isn't chuck hagel the man? should the president nominate him? >> well, it's a controversial choice. ryan crocker truly is a diplomat in the best sense of the word. i like chuck hagel. he served with distinguish in vietnam, an enlisted man, two purple hearts, but quite frankly chuck hagel is out of the mainstream of thinking i believe on most issue
was the architect of the drone policy which has been controversial in places like pakistan and yemen. that's likely to be a topic of conversation in the brennan hearing. they estimate that american drones have killed as many as 171 civilians in yeppen since 2002. the real story is in pakistan where nearly 1,000 people have been killed, civilians, since 2004 by american drones. >> secretary of state hillary clinton is back at work after being hospitalized for three days. the staff welcomed her back to work today with fitting gifts. a football helmet, a jersey with the the 112, whichsomebleizes the number of countries she's visited as secretary of state. this doctor of georgetown university hospital tells "outfront" it can be regulated with medication. >>> and an "outfront" update on a story we have been following. french actor gerard depardieu met with french president vladimir putin over the weekend. the president gave him a passport and he was reportedly offered a job, i'm not joking here, to be cultural minister, but apparently he declined. he seeked russian citizenship. >> it's been 522 days sin
like pakistan, indonesia, and so forth, but, also through christians. she's met who have a direct experience of this. this story is also powerfully documented. one further point i want to, general point i want to make about the book, is to raise a general question to whom is this book addressed? who might benefit from it? well, many people. i hope, i think it's a very suitable gift for the holidays. [laughter] people will go out and buy it. it's not only a very informative and moving book, but it's a very good read because lela's a very good writer. it would say there's several appropriate audiences. first, writing as a christian american is natural that one of her audiences with other christian americans, or at least other non-jewish americans. since it's, you know, conceiving such an audience, that describes of what jewish life is like in israel, and let me say about this, she is remarkably well-informed, a testament to her own curiosity and the hospitality she found among israelis. i should say that perhaps a number of aspects of israeli life and specifically jewish experiences
's a big problem. and frankly, nobody in the u.s. is covering the problems in pakistan, which are very real. pakistan is probably building more nuclear weapons right now than any other countries in the world. we talk about an iranian bomb maybe in the the near future. i think there are whoever a hundred pakistani nuclear weapons and it's a very fragile country with very, very deep problems. afghanistan is decaying, it's not getting better. iraq is decaying, the amount of violence in iraq has gone up dramatically and syria is a mess. and bahrain has a serious problem and yemen is a mess. somalia is a mess. you start looking around and begin to realize there's a much more dangerous world out there than president obama's inaugural address or secretary clinton's testimony today would lead you to believe. >> greta: mr. speaker let me just change the topic. >> greta: i am 'm curious, who the leader of the republican party right now. >> i don't believe we have a leader, and-- >> and i'm talking about, sir, who is the, you know, who does the republican party look to right now? >> the republican par
. iraq, afghanistan and pakistan so every country in the world we are under the kind of contracting world that i think do interfere with our capacity to get the best deal, particularly when it comes to security that we should in these countries where the threats unfortunately are going to always be with us. >> should we look to extend that to the drc come to somalia? >> there was an article i think in one of the newspapers today that went into some detail. basically years has started. federal law required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractor to provide local card services at its embassies abroad and there's that old saying you get what you pay for and this lowest price provision started off in 1990, but it has just stayed with us and i would respectfully request that this committee would take a hard look at it. you can't do a total lifting of it for everybody at least look at the highest post where obviously we did it for iraq and afghanistan and pakistan and the countries that you are naming our countries that i think would fall into that category.
was shot pakistan last october. the taliban targeted her because of stopping young girls from getting education . we wish her all of the best. and there is a movement brewing in texas to get the state to secede from the u.s.. there is it a petition on the white house website that received 124,000 signatures since president obama's reelection. has the fiscal cliff helped thrertheir cause. joining us is it the texas national move the group pushing for secession. tell us why it is it time for texas to secede from the union? >> well, uma, there is it a lot of reasons that we believe that texas should leave the union. but basically it boils down to political freedom that we have loss. cultural freedom and certainly the economy that you have been talking about on your show for the last 45 minutes. there is it 16 trillion rein it is right there and with the negotiations that went on last weekend, we add 4. something trilion. we have 20 trillion reasons to try to protect the economy and people of texas from what we believe is it a certain coming disaster. >> and you folks are leading a seriou
, 10 gunman from pakistan ebay is a militant group fan out across the by attacking a crowded trains grayson, a jewish center and the trade landmarked ties mahal hotel. hadley it helped plan the attack and videotape targets for the gunman. he faced a maximum of life in prison but agreed to cooperate and pleaded guilty to avoid a life sentence. headley also now secured a promise not to be extradited to india. india is now pressuring for hadley to face trial there. >> federal transf transportation investigation it investigators are trying to as figure out the cause of the electrical problems which are ground a boeing 787 dream liner fleet around the world. the national transportation safety board has worked with manufacturers and arizona. and running a series of new tests on airlines' battery systems. investigators say a short circuit in an uncontrolled chemical reaction apparently took place in the boeing 787 battery before that battery caught fire earlier this month in boston. there's still unsure why it happened. we are learning new information as morning about a runaway incident. t
. the terribly difficult challenge dealing with and reducing the flow of calcium ammonium nitrate from pakistan into afghanistan which finds its way into the roadside bombs that kill our troops, known as ied's. thank you for the work. the work on behalf of women throughout the world but also women and girls particularly in afghanistan and even though we are still in the throes of responding to the challenges in syria, the great work you have done on humanitarian assistance and other elements of that strategy we have worked together on. i also want to commend the words he spoke today about not retreating when it comes to getting that balance right queen engagement and also security. both high priorities. i was struck by and i am glad you were so is this a bit on page 3 of your testimony about -- you were so pacific on page 3 of your testimony. the recommendation by the board which now has found its way into the jake now is a set of 64 specific action items. you said 85% are on track to be completed by the end of march. what if any impediments and implementation do you perceive right now and are
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